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Who cares if Al Sharpton was an FBI informant 30 years ago?

aboutal 600Like many people living in New York, I saw the Rev. Al Sharpton's face plastered over copies of the New York Post and the New York Daily News, roasting him for being a "rat" and a "mob snitch." Apparently, Sharpton served a role as an FBI informant against mob bosses in the 1980s. That was around the time I was either wearing diapers or serving as nothing more than a figment of my mother's imagination.

In response to the reports, Sharpton hastily organized a press conference at the National Action Network's headquarters in Harlem to address the reports. Sharpton, very much a black preacher, cleverly refuted the stories by noting, "Rats are usually people that were with other rats. I was not and am not a rat, because I wasn't with the rats. I'm a cat. I chase rats."

Let me repeat that for the folks in the back pews. Reverend Sharpton isn't Master Splinter, he's Heathcliff, ya dig? Can I get an amen?

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Jimmy Carter: ‘Race’ motivates white men to vote Republican

carter 600Former president Jimmy Carter is never shy about speaking his mind on modern politics.

And in a no holds barred interview with Salon, the "Man from Plains" spoke plainly about why a generation of white men have solidly embraced the Republican Party in multiple elections.

"It's race. That's been prevalent in the South.... Ever since Nixon ran — and ever since Johnson didn't campaign in the deep South, the Republicans have solidified their hold there," he said.

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Marlon Wayans talks ‘White Chicks 2,’ defends Nick Cannon in whiteface controversy

marlonwayans 600Marlon Wayans is headed back to the big screen writing, producing and starring in "A Haunted House 2."

In an interview with theGrio's Chris Witherspoon, Wayans opened up about his new film, which hits theaters April 18, and also discussed his plan to do a sequel to 2004's "White Chicks."

The "In Living Color" star revealed who he believes is preventing "White Chicks 2" from getting made.

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Actually, Obama’s record compares just fine with LBJ’s

obamasrecord 600The tenuousness of making comparisons between President Lyndon B. Johnson's vaunted vote-wrangling prowess and the allegedly ineffectual legislative skills of President Barack Obama was nicely summed up on Wednesday with this tweet:

LOLGOP @LOLGOP
In 30 years, the left will be asking why current Democrats don't get things done like Obama did & the right will say Obama was a Tea Partier

Although it's meant to get a laugh – and it's hard to imagine a future where Obama's remembered as a Tea Partier – the upshot – that perceptions change over time – actually holds up pretty well.

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Obama could stand to be a little more like LBJ

LBJ 600On Thursday, President Barack Obama joined other dignitaries at a civil rights summit to commemorate the 50th anniversary of President Lyndon B. Johnson's signature accomplishment as president – passage of the 1964 Civil Rights Act. And in a nod to the shoulders that he stands on, Obama said, "I have lived out the promise of LBJ's efforts."

But some Americans, particularly those who lived through LBJ's presidency, wish that President Obama not only reaped the rewards of President Johnson's leadership but also led more like him. And to that point, I recently attended the critically acclaimed Broadway play All the Way, in which "Breaking Bad" star Bryan Cranston portrays the president during the year in which he struggled and eventually triumphed in his efforts to pass the Civil Rights Act.

Seeing the production, two things became obvious: Cranston will get a Tony Award nomination for his performance, and the president he portrays is very different from the president we have today. After I saw the production with a family member who lived through the civil rights movement, she couldn't help remarking about how different Johnson – one of the presidents she admires most—is from the current president, whom she also admires greatly.

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