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The Iconic Living Legends Award

firstblackmayor 600The Iconic Living Legends Awards Ceremony and Exhibit – scheduled to coincide with National Women's History Month – was held recently on Langston University's Oklahoma City campus.

The Iconic Living Legends Award salutes women who have had an iconic impact on the progress of women. This year's honorees included Lelia Foley-Davis, who became the first African-American woman elected mayor in the United States when she was elected mayor of Taft, Okla. on April 3, 1973.

During her acceptance speech, Foley-Davis took the audience back in time for a glimpse of the past and then reflected on the success and progress that she said so many have had a hand in fostering She brought to life episodes of difficulty and depression, detailing barriers created by whites and blacks. She also emphasized how hard people worked to overcome the obstacles.

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Why College Students Should Also 
Run a Business


collegebusiness 600These days, it seems as though Americans are spending more for college while getting less value in return – a trend research validates, says entrepreneur Matt Stewart.

"The average cost for an in-state public college is $22,261, and a moderate budget for a private college averaged $43,289 for the 2012–2013 academic year; for elite schools, we're talking about three times the cost of your local state school," says Stewart, a spokesperson for College Works Painting, (www.collegeworks.com), which provides practical and life-changing business experience for college students who have shown potential for success. Interns operate their own house-painting business with hands-on guidance from mentors.

Making matters worse, adults in their 30s have 21 percent less net worth than 30-somethings 30 years ago, according to a new Urban Institute report.

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THE RATCHET FILES!

mcdonaldstat 600Cops: Man freed after 15 years robs same store

(Newser) – Christopher Miller robbed the Stride Rite shoe store in Toms River, NJ, in 1999, got caught, and served 15 years in state prison. Police say he became a free man on Friday and celebrated by catching a bus to Toms River and, yes, robbing the same Stride Rite shoe store, reports the Star-Ledger. Though he had 15 years to stew over what went wrong the first time, authorities say this robbery didn't go so well, either. Two employees were so slow in handing over cash that the "agitated" robber grabbed the register drawer himself and fled on foot, reports the Ocean County Signal. (The employees refused to hand over their keys, scotching any hopes for a getaway vehicle.)

They called the cops—the apparent plan was to tie them up in a storage room, as happened in the 1999 robbery, but the employees refused to go—and within minutes, a police K-9 unit tracked down Williams and recovered the stolen $389, reports the Daily Record. Miller is charged with robbery and is being held on $100,000 bond. The 40-year-old is from Tulsa, Okla., and police aren't sure what his connection is to Toms River, besides maybe nostalgia.

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“Gone With the Wind” prequel starring Mammy may be a mistake

mammy 600"Are we ready for Mammy's story?" is a loaded question, with no easy answer.

But it's a question that Simon & Schuster has prompted with the announcement that it will publish a "Gone With the Wind" prequel, "Ruth's Journey," through its Atria imprint, focusing on Mammy, the role in the 1939 film version of the book for which Hattie McDaniel became the first-ever African-American Oscar winner.

A post suggesting movie rights from the black film-focused Indiewire blog Shadow and Act garnered a few comments, including Miles Ellison's "More black servant porn. The renaissance continues. Yay."

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