facebook-icotwitter-icogoogle-icorss-ico
connectsubscribearchives
Log in

Opinion

Gambling on gambling

Gambling on gambling

Gambling and gambling-related problems are common among all racial and ethnic groups, but there's evidence that African Americans are more likely to experience more serious gambling-related troubles t

Read more...

  • Written by William Reed/NNPA

Are Blacks Concerned About Government Spying?

Are Blacks Concerned About Government Spying?

The current spying controversy at the National Security Agency has caught many Americans off guard and has conjured up images of Big Brother. The NSA has secretly collected the private phone calls and internet data of its citizens, allowing the federal agency to monitor people who were not suspected of any unlawful activity.

Edward Snowden, the whistleblower who leaked information on the secret surveillance programs, is now a fugitive in hiding in Hong Kong.

And yet, while civil liberties advocates may find this type of surveillance illegal, an unconstitutional invasion of privacy and even grounds to sue the government, African-Americans may not necessarily react with as much outrage.

Read more...

There aren’t happy endings for teachers in the trenches

There aren’t happy endings for teachers in the trenches

Walking around a high school campus at this time of year you will notice the air floats a little lighter and the sun reflects off smiles a little brighter. Everyone is looking forward to the last day, and the mood can aptly be described as celebratory. Seniors can't wait for graduation, teachers can't wait to sleep in, and even the students with straight Fs are showing up again just to tighten up their game for the summer.

You also cannot help but notice all of the end-of-year celebrations. Senior Awards Night, Hispanic Awards Night, Grad Night, AVID Banquets, Band and Choir concerts, Dance Shows, Leadership Rallies, and to top it all off Graduation. Everyone is getting awards and being recognized. Students are getting scholarships and teachers and counselors are being lauded for their work with these amazing students. The only people you don't see celebrating are, well, the students who aren't amazing and the teachers who teach those kids.

Read more...

  • Written by Matt Amaral/New America Media

Could a tax credit fix the black jobs crisis?

Could a tax credit fix the black jobs crisis?

The May jobs report didn't bring worse news than the April jobs report. But it was still bad news for African Americans, for whom unemployment remains in the double digits.

Although unemployment among whites is 6.7 percent, 13.5 percent of African Americans are unemployed. As America slowly recovers from the recession, Black America appears to be getting left behind. A 2005 study found that race plays a role in hiring decisions, noting that white applicants with criminal records were still statistically more likely to get callbacks for jobs than black applicants without one.

After a Senate roundtable on Thursday about the issue, The Root interviewed three senators about the effects of racial discrimination in the black unemployment crisis and whether or not drastic measures, such as tax incentives for diverse hiring, are needed to address the issue.

Read more...

Strolling down the beauty aisles

Strolling down the beauty aisles

When it comes to looking good, staying on top of your game, and making sure your pursuit of beauty is on point, you know the African-American community has that covered. Nielsen's latest insights highlight hair and skin beauty purchases and behavior, by the numbers among African-Americans and other ethnic groups in the U.S. and Canada in a recent NielsenWire Post titled, " Looking Good: Appealing to Ethnic Consumers in the Beauty Aisle."

Ladies, I'm talking to all of us here. Whether we wear our lovely tresses straight, in locks, curled or rock a natural, cute afro-puff – God-given or store-bought – we all want to make sure we look presentable and feel good about ourselves, and will spend our last dime to do so. And, no, even though we usually think of women when we talk about hair care and beauty, women don't corner the market on giving attention to good looks.

Read more...

Drinking coconut water has its overall benefits

Drinking coconut water has its overall benefits

CHEF TIMOTHY: Coconut water is one of the most popular beverages available on tropical islands and resorts. It has been for hundreds of years. It is an all-natural, hydrating, nutrient-filled, clear fluid that is found on the inside of the fruit, which is encased in a hard brown shell. You'd need the proper tools to crack the shell and extract the liquid.

I'm often asked about the benefits of drinking coconut water and why it seems to be the drink of choice for a lot of people. Coconut water has been traditionally used to treat a variety of health problems, such heat strokes, digestive complications, constipation, dehydration, diarrhea, fatigue, hives, low libido, and urinary tract infections. It has been shown to improve one's overall health.

Read more...

Is ‘Big Brother’ racially biased?

Is ‘Big Brother’ racially biased?

When George Orwell wrote the novel "1984," he envisioned a character, real or imagined "Big Brother" who was a know-all, see-all, omnipotent and elusive presence that intruded into lives because he could. Those who knew about "him" were told that they did not exist, but in many ways, Big Brother may not have existed, either. The omnipotence had taken on a life of its own.

Orwell's book was a book ahead of its time. At a different time, his book could have been dismissed as psychedelic fantasy. Today, he is just a step behind the reality in which we live. Verizon is sharing telephone records. The Department of Justice is monitoring journalists, and the IRS is playing games with those who seek nonprofit status. People pulled over for a minor traffic violation will have to submit fingerprints to find out if they have broken other laws. Big Brother is alive and well in too many layers of our lives,

Read more...

  • Written by Julianne Malveaux

Touch my hair? That will never be cool

Touch my hair? That will never be cool

I'm still not entirely sure what to make of "You Can Touch My Hair," an interactive public art exhibit put together by Un'ruly, which actually encouraged people to touch the hair of black women and ask questions about it.

Basically, three black women with fabulous hair – a poofy 'fro, long locks and what appeared to be a lengthy straight weave – stood in New York City's Union Square Park over the weekend and held signs that announced, "You Can Touch My Hair" to perfect strangers. It was an attempt to create a teachable moment from a very offensive aspect of black girl life, especially for ladies who are natural.

The model with the poofy hair, Malliha Ahmad, ultimately described the experience of allowing strangers to fondle her mane as "amazing" and "empowering."

Read more...

Subcategories