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Opinion

Digging into the need to make health changes

Chef Timothy Moore-160Change can be difficult when it comes to health. Why is this so?

Well, let's start with some observations. There seems to be a preoccupation with living our lives wishing for time to accomplish more of the tasks we have undertaken. This has caused many of us to lose focus and – in some cases – not pay attention to our health.

We're placing more and more trust in gadgets, medical shots, pills, liquid shakes, body wraps and fads thinking they can help us stay healthy. In search of quick-and-simple fixes we run the risk of incurring severe healthcare problems.

Spoiling vs nurturing – How to ensure that your child has it all

Tarrin McGhee-160Babies and young children often serve as the greatest sources of joy in our adult lives.

Maybe that's why we are all guilty at times of going against our better judgment – spending beyond our means or giving in to tearful requests even when we suspect it may not be the right thing to do.

This conflict leads many parents to worry whether they are "spoiling" their child. In common terms, a "spoiled" child is one who is used to getting whatever she wants – and prone to throw temper tantrums when she doesn't.

Eat fresh fruits and vegetables if you want to live

Chef Timothy Moore-160CHEF TIMOTHY Eating fresh fruits and vegetables on a daily basis is key to long life. But longevity cannot be achieved unless there is a lifestyle change. Too many people are afraid of change. They're complacent and uninspired to do what is best for their overall health.

Most people in society are lazy when it comes to taking good care of their health. They don't eat the right foods and don't drink enough water to keep their bodies hydrated. Also – and this is just as important – they don't spend enough time exercising. Many don't exercise at all.

In some respects, we don't think about our health failing. Eating poorly, in addition to living a sedentary lifestyle, is what causes the body to break down and lose its vigor. Food labels are responsible, in most cases, for causing people to err when choosing what foods to purchase.

‘Full plates’ and obesity overload African-American women

Chef Timothy Moore-160Four out of five African-American women have a problem with being obese and each year that number seems to increase. This is an epidemic that must be reversed.

I talked with a woman recently about her weight problem and her struggle to lose the pounds. She had tried every type of diet and weight loss program on the market, but none of them helped her lose the weight. So, instead, she decided to accept the fact that she would never return to her former self, when she was more than 50 pounds lighter.

An integral part of the household, too many African-American women busy themselves around the house and care for the children without regard for themselves. Sedentary lifestyles are associated with weight gain.

George Zimmerman v.s. Trayvon Martin: Can College Grades Prove You're a Murderer ?

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 In exclusive coverage for the Tri-State Defender, Dr. Jason Johnson is reporting from the courthouse in Sanford, Fla., where George Zimmerman is on trial for teh shooting death of Trayvon Martin. Johnson will provide exclusive and intimate details of the trial through it's conclusion. Check back here for coverage you canonly get at the tristatedefender.com

Can a college transcript tell what type of person you turn out to be? Most Americans would say no. The vast majority of us don't believe that what we studied in college has much to do with where we've ended up in life (and the millions of psychology, sociology and biology majors out there working in insurance, human resources and marketing are all nodding their heads in agreement). The strongest connection that most people draw between their undergraduate degrees and real life occurs when they answer an obscure question on Jeopardy. However, in the case of the State of Florida v.s. George Zimmerman, college grades make a difference, and how those grades are viewed could be a matter of life and death.

  • Written by Roz Edward, National Content Director

Drinking coconut water has its overall benefits

Chef Timothy Moore-160CHEF TIMOTHY: Coconut water is one of the most popular beverages available on tropical islands and resorts. It has been for hundreds of years. It is an all-natural, hydrating, nutrient-filled, clear fluid that is found on the inside of the fruit, which is encased in a hard brown shell. You'd need the proper tools to crack the shell and extract the liquid.

I'm often asked about the benefits of drinking coconut water and why it seems to be the drink of choice for a lot of people. Coconut water has been traditionally used to treat a variety of health problems, such heat strokes, digestive complications, constipation, dehydration, diarrhea, fatigue, hives, low libido, and urinary tract infections. It has been shown to improve one's overall health.

Ultimate diversity challenge: Keeping good talent from going to waste

LSW-160Many diversity campaigns took a wrong turn because they focused heavily on cultural deficits – what a particular group lacks or needs – rather than cultural strengths – the unique abilities, talents and strengths of these groups.

Instead of breaking down barriers, as we had hoped, often we ended up broadcasting subtle messages that these groups are inferior and not at all like the rest of us.

Today, a new strategy is taking root. Communities are imagining how a diverse city might function, and the role that everyone – rich and poor, black, Hispanic, Asian and white, Muslim and Christian, liberal and conservative – plays in making the economy competitive. Our ultimate diversity challenge is to figure out how to more fully develop talent in America so each person can contribute fully.

  • Written by Linda S. Wallace

Reflections on Brown v Board

tomekahart-300On the anniversary (May 27th) of Brown v. Board of Education, the landmark case that struck down separate but equal and ushered in the era of integrated schools, I reflected on Chief Justice Warren's published words. On that day in 1954 he wrote, "In these days, it is doubtful that any child may reasonably be expected to succeed in life if he is denied the opportunity of an education. Such an opportunity, where the state has undertaken to provide it, is a right which must be made available to all on equal terms."

As a native Memphian, attorney and Memphis school board member, I can see that segregation and integration have left indelible marks on our public school system. The 59 years that have passed since Warren's sage words have brought us diverse school settings where the benefits of education are more consistently experienced by a larger portion of our society – no question. The charge in the Brown decision was not simply to integrate races in school settings, but to provide consistently excellent education for all children. We are not there yet.