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Sugarmon v Michael

Sugarmon v Michael
 
City Court Judge Tarik Sugarmon says a speech given last year by Shelby County Juvenile Court Chief Magistrate Dan Michael clearly illustrates that Michael does not merit election as Juvenile

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  • Written by Tony Jones
  • Category: Original

Sheriff’s race pits two law enforcement veterans

 Sheriff’s race pits two law enforcement veterans
William “Bill” Oldham currently has the job of Shelby County Sheriff and Bennie L. Cobb, a retired captain from the sheriff’s office, would like to wrest it away from him.
 
Cobb is the Democratic nominee and Oldham, a Republican, has been the sheriff since the 2010 trouncing of the countywide Democratic slate.

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  • Written by Wiley Henry
  • Category: Original

Sierra Leone ‘hero’ Ebola doctor succumbs to deadly virus

Sierra Leone ‘hero’ Ebola doctor succumbs to deadly virus
Sierra Leone’s top Ebola doctor has lost his battle with the deadly virus that is sweeping through West Africa in a record outbreak, Reuters reports.
 
Virologist Sheik Umar Khan, who had treated more than 100 Ebola patients, died Tuesday after fighting the often-fatal virus, which is believed to have already taken the lives of more than 600 people across Guinea, Liberia and Khan’s home country of Sierra Leone. His death, less than a week after his condition came to light, is but one of the latest among the medical professionals and aides helping to fight the infection.

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Toward a cure for HIV: The promise of the ‘Mississippi Baby’

Toward a cure for HIV: The promise of the ‘Mississippi Baby’
MELBOURNE, Australia – Is the glass half empty – or half full? That was the framework for thinking about the so-called Mississippi baby case last week at the International AIDS conference here.
 
The glass was decidedly half empty earlier this month with the news that the baby, thought to have been cured of HIV, had rebounded with detectable levels of the virus in her blood. Quick as a heartbeat, cure was downgraded to remission.

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Upcoming changes to PLUS Loans may help African Americans

Upcoming changes to PLUS Loans may help African Americans
WASHINGTON – This fall, the Department of Education plans to announce changes to PLUS loans that officials say will make it easier for parents to qualify for the financial aid program that thousands of African-American college students rely on every semester.
 
In an effort to combat a rising number of parent loan defaults in 2011, the department began to enforce more strict borrowing guidelines, a move that disproportionately affected African-American parents, especially ones that lost homes and jobs and were burdened by high levels of debt incurred during the Great Recession.

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Black men show little signs of progress in 40 years

Black men show little signs of progress in 40 years

WASHINGTON – Black men are no better off than they were more than 40 years ago, due to mass incarceration and job losses suffered during the Great Recession, according to a new report by researchers at the University of Chicago.
 
Derek Neal and Armin Rick, the co-authors of the study, found that reforms in the criminal justice system at the state-level largely contributed to disparities in arrests and incarceration rates that ultimately stifled educational and economic progress for black men.

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Sentencing guidelines drop for drug offenses

Sentencing guidelines drop for drug offenses
Reducing federal prison terms for drug traffickers currently incarcerated has excited a population that had all but given up hope.
It has also reinvigorated inmates, their parents and attorneys who have fought to get lawmakers to revisit how society punishes those with minor drug offenses.
“The United States has undergone an unprecedented social experiment with its excessive use of incarceration,” said Jon Korin, a local resident whose son received a 100-month federal prison sentence for a nonviolent drug offense.

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Taking America’s art history to the streets

Taking America’s art history to the streets
Americans are going to start noticing something different about the public space in August, and their daily commute will get a lot more artistic and interesting.
 
That’s when “the largest outdoor art show ever,” “Art Everywhere U.S.,” is set to launch—displaying 58 pieces of American art across billboards and on buses, as well as in airports, malls, movie theaters and other public spaces, across all 50 states. The first such art show of its kind to appear in this country, “Art Everywhere U.S.” debuts after a similar public-space exhibition in the United Kingdom was launched last year.

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