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Black identity and racism collide in Brazil

 Black identity and racism collide in Brazil
Before teams representing their countries from around the world arrived in Brazil, the country’s president, Dilma Rousseff, took the opportunity to label 2014 the “anti-racism World Cup.”
 
The declaration came after a wave of racist incidents in soccer around the world targeting black players, many of whom are Brazilian. While it’s a well-intentioned gesture and a particularly important one for a World Cup being hosted in the country that’s home to the largest population of people of African descent outside of Africa, Brazil has a complex past and present when it comes to race.
 
That complexity can perhaps best be illustrated by the fact that many black Brazilians don’t think of themselves as black. Brazilian soccer star Neymar is a great example. Asked during an interview in 2010 if he had ever experienced racism, his response was, “Never.” He added, “Not inside nor outside of the soccer field. Even more because I’m not black, right?”

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Signs of conflict rise in Cohen-Wilkins race

Signs of conflict rise in Cohen-Wilkins race
Challenger Ricky Wilkins says four-term incumbent Steve Cohen “needs to get serious and focus on what’s important” in their race for Tennessee’s 9th congressional district seat.
 
Wilkins statement came in response to Cohen’s campaign filing a complaint to the Federal Election Commission citing Wilkins for incorrect signage for his campaign, which opened its headquarters last Saturday (June 14th) at 3412-14 Poplar.
 
Cohen’s letter to the FEC asserts that, “Ricky Wilkins’ yard signs completely fail to disclose that the communication has been paid for by the authorized political committee. There is no disclaimer on the yard signs.”

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  • Written by Tony Jones
  • Category: Original

New Freedmen’s Bureau Records available for Juneteenth celebration

New Freedmen’s Bureau Records available for Juneteenth celebration
In recognition of Juneteenth, FamilySearch announces the online publication of additional Freedmen’s Bureau records – popular historic sources for those doing African American research that extends back to the Civil War period when slavery was abolished in the United States.
 
Juneteenth, which commemorates the abolition of slavery, begins June 19, with some celebrations extending an entire month. On June 19, 1865, General Gordon Granger and 2,000 federal troops arrived in Galveston, Texas, enforcing the freeing of the slaves. The celebration of Juneteenth (Emancipation Day) began in the streets of Galveston by the former slaves and is now celebrated throughout the nation every year on the same date by millions of people.  

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A cancer challenge for NY Times’ Dean

A cancer challenge for NY Times’ Dean
 
A malignant tumor was removed from the kidney of New York Times Executive Editor Dean Baquet over the weekend, reports Politico.
 
In a memo to his staff, Baquet shared that, “I had minimally invasive, completely successful surgery on Saturday and my doctors have given me an excellent prognosis. I will be out of the office for about a week while I mend.”
 
Here is the full memo:

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Thomas N. Todd: ‘You can’t download freedom’

Thomas N. Todd: ‘You can’t download freedom’
HOLLYWOOD, Fla. – Rapidly-expanding technology, social media and new smart phone apps are no substitute for the hard work needed to fight persistent racism in the United States, says Thomas N. Todd, a longtime Chicago activist and civil rights lawyer.
 
Speaking to the annual convention of 100 Black Men here last week, Todd proudly acknowledged that he doesn’t use email, does not own a computer and doesn’t have a Facebook or Twitter account.

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Tea Party Republican Tim Scott takes another step toward history

Tea Party Republican Tim Scott takes another step toward history
In the wave of news about Virginia voters sweeping House Majority Leader Eric Cantor out of office and into the unemployment line, the media failed to pay much attention to Sen. Tim Scott’s (R., S.C.) overwhelming victory in last week’s Republican primary.
 
The 48 year-old Scott won 90 percent of the vote over challenger Randall Young, who reportedly did not campaign after filing as a candidate. Scott is one of two African Americans in U.S. Senate. The other is Sen. Cory Booker (D., N.J.), who was elected to office last October.

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