facebook-icotwitter-icogoogle-icorss-ico
connectsubscribearchives
Log in

News

CDC locks out black providers

CDC locks out black providers

On March 19th, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) awarded $115 million over five years to 21 organizations to provide technical assistance (TA) and capacity building to health departments, AIDS service organizations (ASOs) and community-based organizations (CBOs) implementing high-impact prevention and improving outcomes in the care continuum for people living with HIV/AIDS.

Not one of the new CDC grantees is a black organization. The effect of this decision is that black organizations have been locked out of leading technical assistance and capacity building in this country for the next five years.

It is obvious why this should be an issue of concern for black people, for the overall public and for anyone who is sincerely interested in ending the AIDS epidemic in America. Let's look at the numbers: There are about 1.2 million Americans living with HIV today. Nearly 50 percent of them are black. Of women living with HIV in the U.S., nearly 64 percent are black; among gay and bisexual men, the rate is 32 percent.

Read more...

How race factors in recent Scotus rulings on elections

How race factors in recent Scotus rulings on elections

Recent Supreme Court decisions on voting rights and political contributions have rescued the Republican Party from the brink of political oblivion and instead threaten to permanently undermine the very fabric of American democracy.

The court's 5-4 decision last week in McCutcheon v. Federal Election Commission eliminated the aggregate cap on individual campaign donations. The ruling promises to, in the words of dissenting Justice Stephen Breyer, "open a floodgate" that will engulf American politics on an unprecedented scale. Ending limits on political contributions to federal candidates means that the court has willfully amplified the already powerful voices of the rich campaign donor class. Chief Justice John Roberts countered Breyer with the reasoning that the decades-old limit on individual donations represented a 1st amendment violation of free speech. From this perspective a dollar in campaign contributions has the equivalent power of $100,000, a notion that is absurd.

 

Read more...

I’m right here and I don’t want you to know!

I’m right here and I don’t want you to know!

Location is one of the most revealing pieces of information about us. In 2013, researchers found that four instances of a person's location at a given point in time were enough to uniquely identify 95 percent of the individuals they examined.

"Human mobility traces are highly unique," the researchers wrote. "Mobility data is among the most sensitive data currently being collected."

Location is also predictive. In another study, researchers at Microsoft were able to use location data to predict where people would be in the future. Wednesdays were the easiest to predict, and weekends the hardest. "While your location in the distant future is in general highly independent of your recent location," the researchers wrote, "it is likely to be a good predictor of your location exactly one week from now."

Read more...

‘One Nation Underemployed’

‘One Nation Underemployed’

WASHINGTON – The wealth gap between African Americans and whites has expanded in recent years and is not likely to narrow without significant reductions in black unemployment and changes in a system that favors the wealthy over poor and middle class Americans, according the National Urban League's 38th annual State of Black America report titled, "One Nation Underemployed: Jobs Rebuild America."

The report was to be released Thursday (April 3rd) at a news conference at the National Press Club in the nation's capital.

In a statement accompanying the report, Marc H. Morial, president and CEO of the National Urban League, said: "The 2014 State of Black America and corresponding Equality Index indicate that while each state and city has its own economic recovery story to tell, the consistent refrain is that there is an urgent and growing disparity between the few who are reaping the rewards of economic recovery and the majority who are still reeling from aftershocks of the Great Recession."

Read more...

April’s significance & the truth about Lincoln

April’s significance & the truth about Lincoln

The month of April: Jackie Robinson, born;Paul Robeson, born; Maya Angelou, born; Coretta Scott King, born’ Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., Murdered!

The month of April is very significant to the discussion of the brutal economic servitude and so-called emancipation of black people in America. For centuries, whites had indulged in directing and controlling the fate of the masses of blacks from birth to death. Then one fateful day, April 11th, 1861, a triggering mechanism was fired that would ultimately prove to be the beginning of the end for America's inhuman practice of enslaving black men, women and children.

The Civil War began. And on April 9th, 1865 – almost four years to the date it began – the "War Between the States ended.

Numerous organized efforts by enslaved blacks and pro emancipation whites (John Brown, etc.) had failed to overcome the tyrannical rule and mass repression of the helpless people. Many of the organized efforts to free themselves failed due to frightened and insecure blacks. Hoping to gain favor with their master, they often revealed the plans.

 

Read more...

Overweight professors

Overweight professors

In the United States, fat-shaming and fat-phobia are as American as apple pie. While the African-American community is more likely to embrace obesity as curvy, that embrace often acts as a defense mechanism against mainstream and European standards of beauty – a standard which excludes anyone who isn't white, thin and blonde, or some acceptable variation.

Yet even as we position full-figured as a body-type to be proud of, the weight loss market continues to be a multi-billion dollar industry.

Why?

Read more...

African Americans say ‘parent involvement’ key to school success

African Americans say ‘parent involvement’ key to school success

The "lack of parental involvement" is the biggest issue affecting African-American students' quality of education.

That is one of major findings in a new national survey of African Americans on factors in their quality of life. The survey, sponsored by the W.K. Kellogg Foundation (WKKF) and Ebony magazine, polled 1,005 African Americans on their mood and on issues related to income, housing, health care, relationships, race and education.

Responses to education-related questions made up a large part of the summary of survey findings. When asked to identify the biggest issues in education, about a fifth of respondents said lack of parental involvement, making it the most frequently cited concern. Other concerns included "overcrowded classrooms" (17 percent), "funding differences among school districts" (17 percent), "quality of teachers" (16 percent), and "students with behavioral issues or special needs" (10 percent).

Read more...

Subcategories