facebook-icotwitter-icogoogle-icorss-ico
connectsubscribearchives
Log in

News

Mental illness is our dirty little secret

Mental illness is our dirty little secret

I'm tired, my sisterfriend says. I don't know how much longer I can hold on. As I hear her I have a couple of choices. One is to tell her to get with her pastor and pray; the other is to tell her to get real with her illness. Running her to her pastor takes her to a familiar place. Pushing her to help takes her out of her comfort zone.

When my beloved brothers and sisters share that they are stymied in the way they live their lives, I don't mind praying and encouraging spiritual counsel, but I do mind ignoring the medicinal help that could assist my sisterfriend.

So my sister is sighing her pain, and I am wondering what to do. There are few that will hear a black woman in a black community, strumming her pain, questioning her faith. According to the National Associations of Mental Health more than 4 percent of African Americans have considered suicide. Most of them are African-American women.

Read more...

  • Written by Julianne Malveaux
  • Category: News

Apple vs. Pears: Which is really the healthiest shape?

Apple vs. Pears: Which is really the healthiest shape?

For years and years and years now, women have used two particular pieces of fruit to define their body shape – and, to a certain extent, their health risks.

An apple shape, where body fat tends to be stored mostly around the waist, is typically considered to be an indicator of higher health risks, especially heart disease, diabetes and cancer.

A pear shape, where body fat tends to be stored mostly around the hips and thighs, is generally considered to be "safer."

Read more...

Teen hides in wheel well of plane and survives 5-hour flight

Teen hides in wheel well of plane and survives 5-hour flight

A 16-year-old boy who had a fight with his parents is "lucky to be alive" after he stowed away in a plane's wheel well and flew from California to Hawaii surviving a lack of oxygen and cold temperatures at 38,000 feet and, the Associated Press reports.

"Doesn't even remember the flight," FBI spokesman Tom Simon in Honolulu told the Associated Press on Sunday night. "It's amazing he survived that."

Simon told AP that security footage from the San Jose airport confirmed that the Santa Clara, Calif., teen climbed a fence to get to Hawaiian Airlines Flight 45 on Sunday morning.

Read more...

‘Hurricane’ Carter went to the mat for the wrongfully accused

‘Hurricane’ Carter went to the mat for the wrongfully accused

With the death of Rubin "Hurricane" Carter, we have lost a great fighter in the ring and a powerful advocate for the wrongfully convicted. In many ways, he helped open the eyes of many to the injustices of a system that far too often throws innocent people behind bars.

Carter knew firsthand about the plight of the wrongly accused because he had spent 19 years behind bars for crimes he did not commit. He and co-defendant John Artis were charged with a triple murder at the Lafayette Grill in Paterson, New Jersey in 1966. There was little physical evidence in the case, and the so-called eyewitnesses who testified against them were two convicted felons. And Carter and Artis maintained their innocence and passed a lie detector test. However, an all-white jury found them guilty. Carter was sentenced to three life sentences.

A victim of an unfair trial with corrupt prosecutors who originally sought the death penalty, Hurricane Carter was released after two decades in prison, including time in solitary confinement. A federal judge found that the prosecution of his case was "predicated upon an appeal to racism rather than reason, and concealment rather than disclosure." Specifically, "the jury was permitted to draw inferences of guilt based solely upon the race" of the defendants, according to the judge.

 

Read more...

Ole Miss frat chapter closed in wake of Noose incident

Ole Miss frat chapter closed in wake of Noose incident

The parent organization of a University of Mississippi fraternity has closed the campus' chapter, nearly two months after expelling three members charged with hanging a noose around the neck of the statue of the school's first African-American student, the Associated Press reports.

The university announced Thursday that the national office of Sigma Phi Epsilon, based in Richmond, Va., had closed the chapter, the AP says.

The three students, all from Georgia, are accused of looping a noose around the neck of a statue of James Meredith and draping its face with a Confederate flag. In 1962, Meredith's enrollment at the university sparked a vociferous outcry from anti-integration protesters.

Read more...

Harlem’s ‘Gang of Four is no more’

Harlem’s ‘Gang of Four is no more’

New York City lost one of its most powerful progressive forces Wednesday with the passing of Basil Paterson.

As a member of the influential "Gang of Four," Paterson – along with former Mayor David Dinkins, late civil rights activist Percy Sutton, and Congressman Charles Rangel – helped to develop the economic and political capital of the city's black community.

With Paterson and Sutton both now deceased, many are now looking back on the legacy of the Gang of Four and wondering if there is a void in New York City's black political leadership.

Read more...

No doubt about it, Wiley College still grooming winners

No doubt about it, Wiley College still grooming winners

Invited to watch a friend give a keynote speech at Wiley College in Marshall Texas, I answered, "Yes and when do we leave" before the question was complete.

I hadn't forgotten that the 2007 movie titled "The Great Debaters" – starring Denzel Washington as Professor Melvin Tolson – was based on a debate team at the very same Wiley College. I still remembered the authority with which Denzel played that lead and the force of his teachings as he braced his team for verbal combat.

The perseverance, courage and outright intellect of the young, evolving debaters was worth the price of admission alone. Fast forward and the legacy of those mighty Great Debaters remains. It hangs from walls, is stuffed in guest-speaker bags, written in bricks, flashes on billboards and is conveniently spoken on the answering machines of the college administrators.

Read more...

  • Written by Kelvin Cowans
  • Category: News

Subcategories