facebook-icotwitter-icogoogle-icorss-ico
connectsubscribearchives
Log in

News

Can the U.S. play a role in rescuing the missing nigerian schoolgirls?

Can the U.S. play a role in rescuing the missing nigerian schoolgirls?

When the bizarre disappearance of Malaysia Airlines Flight 370 captured the global imagination like missed episodes of "Lost," an international military search and rescue response was swift. Two months and a dying black box ping later, no expense has been spared in the effort to find 240 passengers now presumed dead.

Weeks going on a month after the horrific mass kidnapping of 275 Nigerian schoolgirls by Boko Haram militants, and critics charge a milquetoast worldwide response that can't get much past the news ticker. While the reactions range from Twitter feeds accompanied by #BringOurGirlsBack to bubbling hate for the perpetrators, the perceived inability of Nigerian armed forces to match the passion comes at a time when conflict in the country's north is turning a grisly corner.

The tragic kidnappings have put a renewed spotlight on Nigerian President Goodluck Jonathan. Nigeria's leadership finds itself in a tough spot, not at all helped by authorities who seem powerless since Jonathan imposed states of emergency over the northeastern states of Borno, Yobe and Adamawa.

Read more...

Wisconsin ruling proves Voting Rights Act can still be effective

Wisconsin ruling proves Voting Rights Act can still be effective

WASHINGTON – After suffering a major setback last year in the Supreme Court, voting rights advocates are buoyed by a decision last week by a federal judge in Wisconsin striking down the state's voter ID law as racially discriminatory.

John Ulin, a partner at Arnold & Porter LLP and trial counsel, said that U.S. District Judge Lynn Adelman's opinion in the case made clear that the Voting Rights Act of 1965 still has teeth, even after the United States Supreme Court's decision in the Shelby County case, which sharply limited application of the landmark law.

"The court understands the reach of Section 2 of the Voting Rights Act to extend beyond challenges to legislative redistricting and to apply to both denial and practices that prevent people from registering and casting their ballot," said Ulin. "The evidence in the case was critical and the opinion makes that clear."

Read more...

African-American unemployment dips to 5-year low

African-American unemployment dips to 5-year low

WASHINGTON – The African-American unemployment rate fell to 11.6 percent in April, the lowest mark since President Barack Obama took office in January 2009, according to the Labor Department's latest jobs report.

In January 2009, the African-American jobless rate was 12.7 percent. The last time the African-American unemployment rate dipped below 12 percent was in November 2008 when the rate was 11.5 percent.

The economy added 288,000 jobs and the national unemployment rate was 6.3 percent in April, down from 6.7 percent in March.

Read more...

In Tennessee, paradigm shift required for Common Core

In Tennessee, paradigm shift required for Common Core

Tennessee's implementation of the new Common Core State Standards was a focal point of controversy during this year's legislative session. Kimberly L. King-Jupiter, Ph.D., dean of the College of Education and professor at Tennessee State University, is a veteran educator with experience in international comparative education and higher education administration. She shared a few perspectives on Common Core with New America Media editor Khalil Abdullah.

As the Common Core is being rolled out in Tennessee and other states, are people misinformed about what it is and what it aims to do?

It is less that people are misinformed and more that the conversation has become enmeshed in or overshadowed by partisan politics. What needs to be remembered is that the goal of the Common Core State Standards is to create a generation of students who can literally problem solve. It is now less about rote memorization. I think if you understand the intent, it's not something people could be opposed to.

Read more...

Study: U.S. teachers Don’t reflect the diversity of students

Study: U.S. teachers Don’t reflect the diversity of students

A new study from the Center for American Progress and National Education Association has shown that U.S. teachers don't reflect the diversity of their students. According to the study, nearly half of the students who attend public schools are minorities and yet, less than 1 in five of their teachers are nonwhite, Associated Press reports.

The study hopes to call attention to this "diversity gap" at elementary and secondary schools in the United States and both groups believe more can be done to help create more diverse classrooms.

"It becomes easier for students to believe "when they can look and see someone who looks just like them, that they can relate to," Kevin Gilbert, coordinator of teacher leadership and special projects for the Clinton Public School District in Clinton, Mississippi told AP. "Nothing can help motivate our students more than to see success standing right in front of them."

Read more...

Obama mocks ‘Stellar 2013’ at White House Correspondents’ Dinner

Obama mocks ‘Stellar 2013’ at White House Correspondents’ Dinner

President Barack Obama hammered failed GOP presidential candidate Mitt Romney for his infamous comment about poor Americans and the "47 percent" during the campaign trail. On Saturday, the president turned the remark against himself during his speech at the White House Correspondents' Dinner in Washington, D.C.

And so it went. No topic was sacred at the 100th anniversary celebration dinner at the Hilton in Washington, D.C., including the botched rollout of HealthCare.gov, the Republican Party and the media. Comedian and actor Joel McHale of NBC's Community served as host.

Obama, who spoke for 20 minutes, said HealthCare.gov "could've gone better," but said that it instead turned into one of the year's biggest movies, before switching to a title screen for the film Frozen.

Read more...

Lawmakers reconsider mandatory minimum prison terms

Lawmakers reconsider mandatory minimum prison terms

WASHINGTON – Ordered to prison on wire fraud charges, Andrea James embraced her 12-year-old daughter and five-month-old son before saying goodbye for two years.

A rude awakening and a harsh reality check awaited James, a disgraced lawyer, as prison officials escorted her to her new home: a small cell block where she'd bunk with other women of the same skin color.

"No one really told me about the injustices until I became incarcerated," said James, 49. "What I encountered as a black woman walking into prison was heartbreaking because all I saw were black women, many of whom had never even received a parking ticket before but ran into a little trouble because they made a decision, a tough decision, on how they were going to feed their babies."

 

Read more...

Subcategories