facebook-icotwitter-icogoogle-icorss-ico
connectsubscribearchives
Log in

News

Dems embrace early-voting math

 Dems embrace early-voting math
Early voting patterns reported by the Shelby County Election Commission were showing a slim lead for Democratic voters, with the commission reporting a total of 14,879 votes cast at the 21 early voti

Read more...

  • Written by Tony Jones
  • Category: Original

Survey finds sharp increase in teen use of HGH

Survey finds sharp increase in teen use of HGH
NEW YORK – Experimentation with human growth hormones by America’s teens more than doubled in the past year, as more young people looked to drugs to boost their athletic performance and improve their looks, according to a new, large-scale national survey.
 
 
In a confidential 2013 survey of 3,705 high school students, being released Wednesday by the Partnership for Drug-Free Kids, 11 percent reported using synthetic HGH at least once — up from about 5 percent in the four preceding annual surveys. Teen use of steroids increased from 5 percent to 7 percent over the same period, the survey found.

Read more...

Dogs eat better than 1 million children

Dogs eat better than 1 million children
 
The South African charity Feed a Child (http://www.feedachild.co.za/) chose to highlight child poverty in South Africa by portraying a little black boy being fed like a dog by a seemingly affluent white woman. In the ad, the boy has his head on the woman’s lap, at her feet, on his knees, and licking off her fingers. The point, they say?  According to the ad’s tagline “The average dog eats better than millions of children.”
 
The ad ran for about five days in South Africa and its airing generated such a maelstrom. Feed a Child withdrew the ad and “unreservedly” issued an apology. Ogilvy and Mather, the international agency that produced the ad, also apologized “unreservedly.  In her apology, Alza Rautenbach says, “Like a child, I don’t see race or politics – the only thing that is important to me is to make a difference in a child’s life and to make sure that that child is fed on a daily basis.”

Read more...

Meet the online tracking device that is virtually impossible to block

Meet the online tracking device that is virtually impossible to block
A new, extremely persistent type of online tracking is shadowing visitors to thousands of top websites, from WhiteHouse.gov to YouPorn.com.
 
First documented in a forthcoming paper by researchers at Princeton University and KU Leuven University in Belgium, this type of tracking, called canvas fingerprinting, works by instructing the visitor’s Web browser to draw a hidden image. Because each computer draws the image slightly differently, the images can be used to assign each user’s device a number that uniquely identifies it.

Read more...

Journalist wins rights to view James Brown’s documents

Journalist wins rights to view James Brown’s documents
While excitement is brewing for the new James Brown biopic to be released this summer, one freelance journalist is more interested in the legal battle over the Godfather of Soul’s estate.
 
According to the Associated Press, a South Carolina circuit court judge has ordered the state’s attorney general to give Sue Summer the documents she requested under the South Carolina’s Freedom of Information Act, for the investigation she is conducting. Summer wanted records that include the diary of the woman who claimed to be Brown’s wife after his death in 2006, an assessment of Brown’s assets, and other such documents.

Read more...

Why bad breath complaints heat up in the summertime

Why bad breath complaints heat up in the summertime
 
Whether it’s a picnic, beach day, family gathering or a night out with friends, summer is a time when people come together for fun.
 
Unfortunately, there is often a fly in the ointment when embracing the “fun season” – higher gas prices, forgetting your sunscreen, waiting in line for the rollercoaster, or that great social buzz kill, bad breath.

Read more...

UTHSC professor gets boost in quest for insights to help newborns

UTHSC professor gets boost in quest for insights to help newborns
 
A $1.5 million grant from the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases will allow Dr. Adebowale Adebiyi to further investigate newborn kidney function.  
 
Adebiyi is an assistant professor in the Department of Physiology at the University of Tennessee Health Science Center (UTHSC). With the grant he will focus on the functions of cell membrane proteins known as “ion channels” that are located in blood vessels and glomeruli (delicate units where blood is cleaned and filtered) within the kidneys.

Read more...

Subcategories