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Brooks battles on to keep her seat

Brooks battles on to keep her seat
The legal battle between District 2 County Commissioner Henri Brooks and opponents on the Shelby County Commission was set to return to Shelby County Chancery Court on Thursday, July 3rd. 
 
Brooks sought injunctive relief from the court against the commission after allegations that she did not live in the district led to the vote removing her from the commission. While the matter still was pending at The New Tri-State Defender’s print deadline, the most recent ruling seemed to favor Brooks, who is seeking a final favorable decision from the court before the commission’s next meeting on Monday (July 7th).

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  • Written by Tony Jones
  • Category: Original

Climate change can change one’s well-being

Climate change can change one’s  well-being
 
WASHINGTON – For most of the nearly 30 years since Dr. Nicole Brodie’s asthma diagnosis, the athlete and Army veteran has been able to maintain an uninterrupted life, continuing to teach elementary school, coach a children’s team, and remain active. She was partly able to do this by moving her family from New York State to Atlanta for the warmer climate.
 
“When I arrived in Atlanta, my asthma was controlled with just [an] albuterol [inhaler] as needed,” she said at a panel event last week. “But in the last 10 to 15 years, I have had to be on oral steroids…I’ve increased to daily Allegra [allergy pill] and nasal sprays. And I keep a Benadryl on me at all times. I have to take four-to-five pills a day to manage my symptoms.”
 
And three weeks ago, she found herself in the hospital for an emergency intervention. The heat index had risen too quickly, causing her lungs to fall to 75 percent capacity.

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Mobilizing key groups can change ‘Deep South’ politics

 Mobilizing key groups can change ‘Deep South’ politics
As voters’ rights advocates and civil rights leaders embrace the 50th anniversary of the 1964 “Freedom Summer” in Mississippi, a new study by the Center for American Progress finds that shifting demographics in the South can help to accelerate meaningful social and political change.
 
The report titled, “True South: Unleashing Democracy in the Black Belt 50 Years After Freedom Summer,” defined the Black Belt, a region known for its rich soil and history of plantation slavery, as regions in the following: Alabama, Arkansas, Delaware, Florida, Georgia, Maryland, Louisiana, Mississippi, North Carolina, South Carolina, Tennessee, Texas, and Virginia.
 
According to the report, between 2000 and 2010, “the non-Hispanic white population in the South grew at a rate of 4 percent, while the so-called ‘minority’ population in the region experienced a 34 percent growth, the greatest out of any region in the country.”

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Nigerian singer offers virginity in exchange for abducted school girls

Nigerian singer offers virginity in exchange for abducted school girls
One Nigerian pop star is taking the fate of the missing Chibok schoolgirls into her own hands, saying that she is willing to give her virginity to Boko Haram in exchange for the more than 200 who are still missing, the New York Daily News reports.
 
“It is just unfair. They are too young. I wish I could offer myself in exchange,” 23-year-old Adokiye recently told Vanguard’s Showtime, according to the Daily News. “They are between 12- and 15-year-old girls for Christ sake. I am older and more experienced. Even if 10 to 12 men have to take me every night, I don’t care. Just release these girls and let them go back to their parents.” 
 
However, whether Adokiye was going for a selfless gesture or not, it did not go over well with Twitter users who accused her of being “attention-seeking” and using the tragic circumstances to her own benefit.

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Locked-out Kellogg’s employees see light ‘at the end of the tunnel’

Locked-out Kellogg’s employees see light ‘at the end of the tunnel’
“We’re not there just yet, but I can see the light at the end of the tunnel. It’s been a long, hard road. When we were locked out back in  October last year, our medical insurance was cut off that same day. My wife has been so sick because we couldn’t afford to get her medication. Just today, we spent $500 on a 30-day supply for one medicine. She hasn’t consistently had what she needed. Her health is so bad now. We’ve just about gone through what we saved up…but this is good news from the courts. After July 10th, this should all be over. Thank God…”
 
 – Locked-out employee on the Kellogg’s picket line
 
Two rulings on Monday (June 23rd) against the Kellogg’s Company dealt virtual death blows in the legal battle against 226 Memphis workers locked out of their jobs since October, 2013.

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  • Written by Dr. Sybill C. Mitchell
  • Category: Original

Police association gets behind Wilkins

Police association gets behind Wilkins
 
Ninth District congressional candidate Ricky Wilkins says his recent endorsement by the Memphis Police Association is a clear indication that incumbent Steve Cohen is no shoe-in for the August 7th election that will decide who will occupy the seat for the next two years.
 
The unanimous decision by the union’s political action committee was announced at a press conference Tuesday (June 24) at the MPA’s headquarters. 
 
Hosted by MPA President Michael Williams, the tone of the press conference was salty in its criticism of Cohen. The union endorsed Cohen in his last race, but Williams said that turned out to be mistake. 

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  • Written by Tony Jones
  • Category: Original

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