McQueen directs Hopson to share Memphis student information with charter operator

Caroline Bauman, Chalkbeat TN | 8/22/2017, 11:14 a.m.
Tennessee’s education chief has sided with a charter operator in the ongoing tug-of-war between Shelby County Schools and the state’s ...
Education Commissioner Candice McQueen and Shelby County Schools Superintendent Dorsey Hopson flank Gov. Bill Haslam at a 2016 event in Memphis. This week, McQueen sided against Hopson's administration in its battle with a charter operator over the sharing of student information.

Tennessee’s education chief has sided with a charter operator in the ongoing tug-of-war between Shelby County Schools and the state’s Achievement School District over student contact information.

Commissioner Candice McQueen directed Superintendent Dorsey Hopson on Monday to immediately share the information requested by Green Dot Public Schools. She said the district’s refusal violates a new state law by withholding information that charter operators need to recruit students and market their programs.

“This is the only way to enable and support parents in making truly informed decisions about their children’s education,” McQueen said in a letter to Hopson.

Sharing student information would help to level the playing field in Memphis, where Shelby County Schools has aggressively sought to stem the exodus of students to state-run charter schools, most of which were once locally run before the state intervened due to chronic low performance.

Green Dot’s five state-authorized Memphis schools have contributed to that drain, and Hopson’s administration has pulled back on accommodating charter operators’ requests for information. The district contends that such sharing would violate federal student privacy laws, but McQueen said that’s not the case.

The commissioner’s stance sets up a possible legal battle between Shelby County Schools and the state.

“We are in receipt of the letter and will be reviewing the basis for the Commissioner’s response to determine next steps,” said spokeswoman Natalia Powers.

The state’s directive also could have implications for other districts like Nashville’s, which have received similar requests from charter operators.

Earlier this year, state lawmakers sought to address the tug-of-war in a sweeping overhaul of the state’s charter school law. One provision requires local districts to hand over student data to approved charters within 30 days of a request.

Megan Quaile, executive director of Green Dot Tennessee, said she was pleased with the commissioner’s position and hopes that Shelby County Schools will comply.

“Our interest is making sure our communities are well informed,” Quaile said. “(The student directory information) is a vehicle by which that can happen.”

You can read McQueen’s full letter to Hopson here