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‘The Myth of Race, The Reality of Racism’

racemyth 600"From today's perspective in a media-soaked world all too familiar with the genomic footprints of human DNA and the tracings of the double-helix back to an African origin, it has become considerably easier to accept the notion that, like nations, 'races' are what Benedict Anderson calls 'imagined communities' – social constructs, fabrications made in history by historical forces, and which acquire meaning only in relation to identifiable others.

"But it is also easy to forget that just 20 years ago, the explanatory power of race had not yet been deconstructed thoroughly enough to prevent the best-selling publication of... Charles Murray's "The Bell Curve," wherein the ancient logics of racial inferiority and domination were reconfigured in full display, with all the illusory trappings of authoritative social science."
– From the Introduction by Professor John S. Wright (page 2)

The Genome Project has proven scientifically that there's only one race, the human race. But despite definitive proof that race is purely a fabrication of man's imagination, racism continues to persist.

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The 19th Annual Sisterhood Outreach Summit & Showcase postponed

sisterhood 600The 19th Annual Sisterhood Outreach Summit & Showcase sponsored by Grace Magazine and typically held in June has been postponed.

"We regret any disappointment created by the postponement of the Sisterhood Showcase," said Christina Stevison, owner and publisher of Grace Magazine, in a released statement.

"The Showcase has a rich legacy and reputation for being one of the Mid-South's favorite events. Unfortunately, due to litigation filed against former employees Toni Harvey, the magazine's former editor-in-chief, and Chris Boyd, former operations director, Grace Magazine will not be able to produce a Showcase in June 2014.

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Can we make it to the ‘Promised Land?’

RonDaniels 600Friday, April 4, marks the 46th anniversary of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.'s assassination on a balcony in Memphis. Black America and people of goodwill in the nation and the world were stricken by grief, frustration and anger at the murder of this great man of justice and peace. Indeed, rebellions erupted in urban centers across the nation by people who could not fathom how an apostle of non-violence could be struck down so viciously and violently. It was clear that America was at yet another crossroad in the quest to achieve racial, economic and social justice.

Despite constant death threats, Dr. King never flinched in his determination that this nation should be made to live up to its creed. The night before he was murdered, he reluctantly mounted the podium at the Mason Temple Church in Memphis and seemed to have a premonition of his impending demise. Yet, he proclaimed that he was not afraid dying.

In the most memorable part of his oration he took the audience to the "mountaintop" with him and declared that he had "seen the promised land." Sensing that his life would be cut short he said, "I may not get there with you. But I want you to know tonight, that we, as a people, will get to the Promised Land."

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Mixed record on progress of black women


MelanieLCampbell 600Despite the stubborn persistence of racial disparities in health, there is cause for black women to celebrate.

"Overall, our life expectancy continues to rise, while teenaged pregnancy rates have dropped dramatically. And most recently, the rate of HIV infection among black women has fallen tremendously, down over 20 percent in just two years' time," says a new report, "Black Women in the United States, 2014: Progress and Challenges," presented by the Black Women's Roundtable, a division of the National Coalition on Black Civic Participation.

But not all of the news about black women is good.

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Judge upholds election of Kevin Johnson in Black Mayors’ rift

mayor 600WASHINGTON – After intense internal fighting, court battles and competing board of directors that have characterized Sacramento, Calif. Kevin Johnson's term as president of the National Conference of Black Mayors since last May, his first month in office, a judge has ruled decidedly in Johnson's favor, effectively firing Executive Director Vanessa R. Williams and nullifying all actions of the rump board challenging Johnson's right to remain in office.

Fulton County Superior Court Judge Christopher S. Brasher issued his ruling in Atlanta last week.

"We're gratified that the court has validated the election of our leadership and vindicated our efforts to take the necessary steps to restore accountability and fiscal integrity to this venerable and critical organization," Johnson said in a statement. "Now we can move forward by taking the actions that will address any outstanding problems we have in order to ensure that the NCBM will benefit current and future mayors and their constituents."

In some ways, it may be a Pyrrhic victory for Johnson. He is limited to one term, which expires in May. Johnson is also vice president of the U.S. Conference of Mayors and is a leading candidate to become president of the group in June.

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