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‘Unpopular Black Opinion’ confessions

‘Unpopular Black Opinion’ confessions

There are unpopular opinions, and then there are unpopular black opinions. Have you ever been talking to your friends and let one slip? Maybe you've come out as anti-"Scandal" or, worse, turned the station when a Beyoncé song came on. The backlash that can come from speaking your truth is enough to make you worry that your proverbial black card will be revoked.

But when we asked our readers to be brave and tell us what, in their experience, #notallblackpeoplelike, they answered. From corn bread to "Real Housewives of Atlanta" to religion, these preferences pushed back on the stereotypes about African Americans. The lesson learned (again) is that the black community has never been a monolith. If you have an seemingly unpopular black opinion, you might actually be in good company.

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Malcolm X’s influence on today’s youth

Malcolm X’s influence on today’s youth

"Education is our passport to the future, for tomorrow belongs to those who prepare for it today," Malcolm X stated during the Organization of Afro-American Unity's founding forum at Manhattan's Audubon Ballroom on June 28, 1964.

A caravan of grassroots activists trekked to the gravesites of Malcolm X and Betty Shabazz at Ferncliff Cemetery in Hartsdale, N.Y., on the morning of May 19th to commemorate his 89th physical day anniversary. There they were met by other admirers, some of whom had traveled from all over the country.

"This is a sacred ceremony paying respect to a martyr that died in the revolution," said moderator James Small at the beginning of the commemorative event, which was begun by Malcolm's sister Ella Collins in 1965. "He gave his life on behalf of those of us who now live. One of the reasons for coming is to say thank you and show respect to that spirit."

 

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New NAACP president says protest in his DNA

New NAACP president says protest in his DNA

When Rev. Frederick D. Haynes III of Dallas learned that the NAACP Board of Directors had chosen Cornell William Brooks over him, attorney Barbara R. Arnwine and several other better-known candidates to succeed outgoing president Benjamin Todd Jealous, his response was "Who?"

And he wasn't the only one responding that way.

In an interview from Florida, where trustees had just made their selection, a board member who asked not to be identified by name said, "We turned the whole nation into a collection of owls," he said. "When they learned of our decision, everyone in the country was saying, "Who? Who? Who?"

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8-year-old hero laid to rest

8-year-old hero laid to rest

Eight-year-old Martin Cobb and his 12-year-old sister had a special bond. They were by all accounts inseparable as siblings, best friends and playmates.

"They were never apart," said the Rev. Theodore L. Hughey, the pastor at Abundant Life Church of God in Christ, the family's church in Richmond, Va. They would ride bikes and big wheelers together, play side by side with children in their South Side neighborhood and brag about their mother's fine down-home cooking, he told the Richmond Free Press.

Marty had a special affinity for keys of any type, the pastor added. In a tragic event that has captured the nation's heart, Marty now is being fondly remembered as a courageous hero. Local and national media are telling the heart-rending story of how Marty died May 1, while bravely trying to protect his beloved sister from a sexual predator as they played around noon near railroad tracks behind the family's home in the 200 block of Brandon Road.

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Fighting the war at home on Memorial Day and every day

Fighting the war at home on Memorial Day and every day

They are the unsung heroes. There are no monuments built to them and no medals of honor awarded, yet they fight every day in the aftermath of America's wars in Iraq and Afghanistan.

They are the caregivers: the families who love and care for the wounded warriors who come home transformed and tormented.

"We stand quietly in the back," says 35-year-old Tai Kimes, whose husband Casey returned from combat suffering from post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and severe traumatic brain injury (TBI).

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The passion of service to our troops in a war that’s not over

The passion of service to our troops in a war that’s not over

My job is about passion.

It's a passion to lead. It's a passion to succeed. And it's a passion to give people a little bit better of a day – or even just a moment – amid some of the biggest challenges of their lives.

I'm the manager at USO Kandahar, one of seven remaining USO centers in Afghanistan. Thought that war was over? A lot of other Americans do, too. But we've still got thousands of U.S. troops serving in harm's way every day. And when those men and women need a break, a nap or a place to call home, they come to our center.

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‘Stealing education’ – the aftermath

‘Stealing education’ – the aftermath

CHICAGO – When an Ohio judge sentenced Kelley Williams-Bolar to jail for enrolling children in a suburban school district where their grandfather lived sharp words were spoken. "I will make an example out of you," said the judge.

She was right.

Williams-Bolar is an example of a courageous black woman who feared for the safety of her children when her Akron home was burglarized and a mother who wanted her children to have a good education.

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