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Upcoming changes to PLUS Loans may help African Americans

Upcoming changes to PLUS Loans may help African Americans
WASHINGTON – This fall, the Department of Education plans to announce changes to PLUS loans that officials say will make it easier for parents to qualify for the financial aid program that thousands of African-American college students rely on every semester.
 
In an effort to combat a rising number of parent loan defaults in 2011, the department began to enforce more strict borrowing guidelines, a move that disproportionately affected African-American parents, especially ones that lost homes and jobs and were burdened by high levels of debt incurred during the Great Recession.

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Black men show little signs of progress in 40 years

Black men show little signs of progress in 40 years

WASHINGTON – Black men are no better off than they were more than 40 years ago, due to mass incarceration and job losses suffered during the Great Recession, according to a new report by researchers at the University of Chicago.
 
Derek Neal and Armin Rick, the co-authors of the study, found that reforms in the criminal justice system at the state-level largely contributed to disparities in arrests and incarceration rates that ultimately stifled educational and economic progress for black men.

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Sentencing guidelines drop for drug offenses

Sentencing guidelines drop for drug offenses
Reducing federal prison terms for drug traffickers currently incarcerated has excited a population that had all but given up hope.
It has also reinvigorated inmates, their parents and attorneys who have fought to get lawmakers to revisit how society punishes those with minor drug offenses.
“The United States has undergone an unprecedented social experiment with its excessive use of incarceration,” said Jon Korin, a local resident whose son received a 100-month federal prison sentence for a nonviolent drug offense.

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Taking America’s art history to the streets

Taking America’s art history to the streets
Americans are going to start noticing something different about the public space in August, and their daily commute will get a lot more artistic and interesting.
 
That’s when “the largest outdoor art show ever,” “Art Everywhere U.S.,” is set to launch—displaying 58 pieces of American art across billboards and on buses, as well as in airports, malls, movie theaters and other public spaces, across all 50 states. The first such art show of its kind to appear in this country, “Art Everywhere U.S.” debuts after a similar public-space exhibition in the United Kingdom was launched last year.

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Unwavering, Richmond still pushing for change

Unwavering, Richmond still pushing for change
The testimonials on Dr. Isaac Richmond’s campaign website painting him as the “most qualified” candidate to represent the 9th Congressional District are indicative of his influence on those who share his commitment to fighting injustice and inequality. But can that influence be translated to a wider audience that can send him to Washington?
 
“Dr. Richmond, beyond question, is the best, the most capable, and the most qualified man to represent the people as U.S. Congressman for the 9th district,” said Joe Green, director, West Tennessee District of the Commission on Race and Religion (CORR) and Richmond’s campaign manager.

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  • Written by Wiley Henry
  • Category: Original

Dems embrace early-voting math

 Dems embrace early-voting math
Early voting patterns reported by the Shelby County Election Commission were showing a slim lead for Democratic voters, with the commission reporting a total of 14,879 votes cast at the 21 early voting sites by TSD press time Wednesday evening.
 
The three leading satellite locations were White Station Church of Christ – 1045; New Bethel Church – 1036; and the Agri Center – 924.

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  • Written by Tony Jones
  • Category: Original

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