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All students benefit from minority teachers

All students benefit from minority teachers
Despite the cry from people of color for more teachers who look like them, both whites and blacks benefit from a more diverse teaching force, according to a study by Center of American Progress.
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  • Written by Freddie Allen-NNPA News Service
  • Category: National

Tamron Hall’s natural hair is a bigger deal than you might think

Tamron Hall’s natural hair is a bigger deal than you might think
 
Friday morning, Tamron Hall, the “Today” show’s first African-American female co-host, unexpectedly revealed her natural kinks and curls on national television.
 
After the unveiling, the news program – in an “I can’t believe they’re actually doing this” move – polled its audience regarding whether Hall, 43, should stick with her natural look on-air.
 
Somewhat surprisingly and thankfully – given white America’s well-documented resistance to African-American women who buck conventional beauty ideals – 70 percent of viewers who tweeted in response said that Hall’s tightly curled style was a winner.

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  • Written by Erin C.J. Robertson-The Root
  • Category: National

Use of arrest records at heart of class action suit against U.S. Census Bureau

Use of arrest records at heart of class action suit against U.S. Census Bureau
Did the U.S. Census Bureau unlawfully screen out approximately 250,000 African-Americans from temporary jobs for the 2010 census?
 
That’s the assertion in a class action lawsuit certified by a New York federal court on Monday (July 1st), the eve of the 50th anniversary of the enactment of the Civil Right Act of 1964.
 
U.S. Magistrate Judge Frank Maas’ 61-page opinion ensures that the lawsuit, pursued under Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, will go forward as a class action on behalf of African-American job applicants who were denied Census Bureau employment because of its criminal background check policy.
Filed in April 2010, the lawsuit alleges that in hiring nearly a million temporary workers, most of whom went door to door seeking information from residents, the Census Bureau erected unreasonable, largely insurmountable, hurdles for applicants with arrest records – regardless of whether the arrests were decades old, for minor charges, or led to criminal convictions.

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  • Written by Outten & Golden LLP
  • Category: National

American Bar Association makes Judge Bernice Donald an award winner

American Bar Association makes Judge Bernice Donald an award winner
 
Sixth Circuit Court of Appeals Judge Bernice B. Donald is the recipient of the 2014 John H. Pickering Award of Achievement, presented by the Senior Lawyers Division of the American Bar Association.
 
In her letter nominating Donald for the award, Fremont, Calif., attorney Pauline Weaver wrote, “Judge Donald represents the best of the profession. She has consistently demonstrated the kind of integrity, legal ability, access to justice and public service that would make John Pickering proud. She is uniquely qualified for the award.”
 
Washington, D.C., lawyer Brooksley Born, chair of the Pickering Award Selection Committee, said, “Bernice Donald has followed in John Pickering’s footsteps in her strong commitment to equal justice, her devotion to the legal profession and her generosity in mentoring younger lawyers.”

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  • Written by Tri-State Defender Newsroom
  • Category: National

Dallas County accidentally backs reparations

Dallas County accidentally backs reparations
It was a mistake … but it was well executed.
 
During a recent meeting of the Dallas County Commissioners Court last week, officials voted on an item called the “Juneteenth Resolution,” in reference to the annual commemoration of the day U.S. soldiers arrived in Texas to free slaves after the end of the Civil War (June 19, 1865). The only African-American commissioner, John Wiley Price, submitted the resolution. The resolution eventually came up for a voice vote and was passed unanimously.
 
But Price’s resolution addressed more than Juneteenth. Price’s resolution addressed everything from the injustices of slavery to Jim Crow laws to predatory lending practices that African Americans have been subjected to.

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  • Written by NNPA News Service
  • Category: National

Flagging kids in early grades as ‘at risk’ – Does it help or harm?

Flagging kids in early grades as ‘at risk’ – Does it help or harm?
 
Long before students have even entered ninth grade, teachers are looking to detailed data to figure out which kids are most likely to drop out of high school. Though this flagging system can call attention to a need for additional help to a potential dropout, there may be concerns, like inaccurate predictions, or worse, lowered expectations.
 
At Clinton Middle School in East Los Angeles, teachers are using a system called Early Warning Indicators, or EWI, which is part of a school transformation program called Diplomas Now, currently used in 14 cities around the country. The system is based on recent research out of Johns Hopkins University that shows what specific factors best predict the likelihood of dropping out of high school. The warning system uses three data points – suspensions or behavior, attendance, and grades in middle school — to identify kids at risk of not making it to high school graduation. According to an op-ed written by Diplomas Now in the New York Times, in the 2012-13 school year, “the program achieved a 41 percent reduction in chronically absent students, a 70 percent reduction in suspended students, a 69 percent reduction in students failing English and a 52 percent reduction in students failing math.”

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  • Written by Alyson Bryant-VoiceWaves / New America Media
  • Category: National

‘Is that a misquote on the memorial tomb of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.?’

‘Is that a misquote on the memorial tomb of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.?’
“The inscription on the memorial tomb of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., is not what he said in his world famous speech, ‘I Have A Dream,’” said James D. Sewell, publisher of a new website, www.MLK-Tomb-Misquote.com, which is dedicated to correcting what Sewell calls an insult to Dr. King.
 
“I recently logged onto the U.S. Park Service website to research a tribute poem I was writing about Dr. King, when I discovered what looked like a misquote on Dr. King’s memorial tomb,” said Sewell.
 
“When I first saw it, I wasn’t really sure what to think,” said Sewell. “I could not believe that a man of Dr. King’s stature would be misquoted on his memorial tomb, and especially in his most famous speech.”

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  • Written by Tri-State Defender Newsroom
  • Category: National

Blacks have not recovered from the recovery

Blacks have not recovered from the recovery
 Judging from its June 18-19 meeting, the Federal Reserve is hedging its bets.  It says the U.S. economy is on the mend, but more slowly than expected.  They’ve reduced their estimate for economic growth and say that it will take a year or more to get to where we were six years ago.
 
 
The International Monetary Fund (IMF) has offered a starker forecast. Expected growth for the United States is about 3 percent, a level considered “normal” and “in recovery.”  They projected something right above 2 percent earlier this year.  Now, they say the United States economy will grow at about 1.9 percent, below robust recovery, and that it will take until 2018 to get the labor market back on track.

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  • Written by Tri-State Defender Newsroom
  • Category: National