facebook-icotwitter-icogoogle-icorss-ico
connectsubscribearchives
Log in

Wagatwe Wanjuki: How to fail a rape victim

Wagatwe Wanjuki: How to fail a rape victim
After reading “Colleges Become the Victims of Progressivism,” where Washington Post columnist, conservative, and consistent curmudgeon George Will argued that there is no campus rape epidemic and that victims of sexual assault are lying, Wagatwe Wanjuki, took to Twitter to chronicle her own rape. While doing so, she revealed that after opening up about being a victim of sexual violence, she was asked to leave her school.
 
Wanjuki tweeted:
 
Where's my survivor privilege? Was expelled & have $10,000s of private student loans used to attend school that didn't care I was raped.
11:16 AM - 9 Jun 2014

Read more...

  • Written by Michael Arceneaux-NewsOne
  • Category: National

When it comes to voting, Freedom Summer wasn’t a one-time event

When it comes to voting, Freedom Summer wasn’t a one-time event
In January, my father retraced steps he took 50 years ago in Hattiesburg, Miss. As a teenager in 1964, he had locked arms with men and women of goodwill seeking the most sacred and elusive right of citizenship: the vote.
Later that year, Mississippi would become the site of the extraordinary Freedom Summer, when students and activists poured into our home state to register voters and teach in Freedom Schools. But a half-century later, freedom remains unclaimed by too many as millions of African Americans, Latinos and Asian Americans remain unregistered to vote.
 
The Center for American Progress (CAP) recently released a stunning study, True South: Voters of Color in the Black Belt 50 Years After Freedom Summer, examining the changing demographics in the South. The findings are straightforward but complex: Despite holding the keys to political power, too few voters of color have taken the initial step toward exercising this capacity.

Read more...

  • Written by Rep. Stacey Abrams-The Root
  • Category: National

Americans fess up to dangerous driving behaviors

Americans fess up to dangerous driving behaviors
(PRNewswire) – All over the country, grills are heating, drinks cooling and long-ago-planned vacations are fast approaching. For those reading these annual touchstones like so many iced tea leaves, all signs point to summer – even if its official start date isn’t until June 21.
 
While summer brings with it many things to celebrate, it's a time to be on alert as well. All those summer road trips add up to a whole lot of cars on the road. Couple  that with summer being the most dangerous time of year for teen car accidents, and you realize the importance of keeping both eyes on the road. So how are Americans doing? When it comes to knowing what behaviors are dangerous behind the wheel, Americans have most of their facts straight. When it comes to actually avoiding those behaviors though, a clear disconnect continues to exist between the dangers Americans acknowledge and what they do anyway.

Read more...

  • Written by Tri-State Defender Newsroom
  • Category: National

Republicans should learn from Cantor’s mistake

Republicans should learn from Cantor’s mistake
The recent defeat of House Republican Majority Leader Eric Cantor sent shock waves throughout D.C. like I have never seen before.  But, in Cantor’s defeat, I see great opportunity for the Republican Party to make inroads into the black community.
 
Cantor represents Virginia’s 7th Congressional District, which is a suburb of Richmond.  According to the 2010 U.S. Census, it has a population of 757,917 (74.3 percent white, 17.1 percent black), median income of $ 64,751.  In other words, it is the definition of a middle-class district.  The district is rated as a solid Republican (R+10).

Read more...

  • Written by Raynard Jackson-NNPA News Service
  • Category: National

Women of color urge Obama to ‘re-align’ My Brother’s Keeper

Women of color urge Obama to ‘re-align’ My Brother’s Keeper
WASHINGTON – More than 1,000 women of color released a letter to President Obama Tuesday asking him to expand his White House initiative aimed at African American and Latino males to include women and girls of color.
 
Those who signed the letter include Mary Frances Berry, former chair of the U.S. Commission on Civil Rights; Pulitzer Prize-winning novelist Alice Walker; actress Rosie Perez; political activist Angela Davis; Anita Hill, a law professor best known for testifying that she had been sexually harassed by future Supreme Court Justice Clarence Thomas and economist Julianne Malveaux.

Read more...

  • Written by George E. Curry-NNPA News Service
  • Category: National

Do-it-herself diva

Do-it-herself diva
As the heads of many American households, women are increasingly forced to reckon with not only the odd handyman job like mowing lawns or replacing sealants, but also more demanding household repairs including plumbing and electrical work. In fact, what was once considered the man’s terrain within the home has become a space where women actively flex their muscle.
 
According to a recent survey by the Home Improvement Research Institute, the number of home improvement products purchased by women has increased over the years. Women account for more than $70 billion worth of purchases in the home improvement industry, up from just over $55 billion in 1995. This rising trend is due to women owning their own homes and tackling their own home repair projects. Industry research shows that single women are purchasing new homes at twice the rate of single men, and within the first year of home ownership, women spend almost $9,000 on home improvement projects. Contributing to the growing trend of women purchasing tools are home improvement shows and hardware stores.

Read more...

  • Written by F. Sia Ahmadu and Shantella Y. Sherman-NNPA News Service
  • Category: National

Perceptions of equality

Perceptions of equality
A recent interview of Morgan Freeman by CNN host Don Lemon lit a firestorm of conversation. Freeman argued that his personal success, and that of Lemon’s, made it clear that racism was not a factor in closing America’s growing problem of inequality.
 
Freeman argued that inequality was a crisis because a vibrant middle class was needed for the growth of the economy and stability of society, and the current chasm between the 1 percent and the 99 percent was unhealthy. Clearly, Freeman’s views on inequality are incontrovertible, so why the storm about his statement on the role of race?

Read more...

  • Written by William Spriggs
  • Category: National