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Greater Metro

‘The Education Before the Education’

lougossett 600When Oscar-winning actor Louis Gossett Jr. spoke Tuesday evening (Feb. 25th) at the University Center Theatre at the University of Memphis, he spoke from the topic, "The Education Before the Education."

Co-sponsored by the Student Event Allocation, Gossett's address covered such topics as progress and issues concerning race. He provided the audience with insight and wisdom, a characteristic of someone who's learned from his experiences.

And Gossett has quite a bit of experience under his belt. For example, in 1953, when he was 16 years old, he landed his first major role in the Broadway play "Take A Giant Step." He beat out 400 other aspiring actors, which launched his career.

Former TSD sports editor played in Negro Baseball League

billlittlememphis 600The type of people that William Otis "Bill" Little knew and befriended could easily become the topic of conversation around the water cooler, perhaps because many of them were reputed for their achievements in sports and education.

But those who knew Little would consider him to have been just as accomplished in both fields as his distinguished friends.

Little was the sports editor for the Tri-State Defender for more than 50 years, an educator, basketball coach and sports official. He also played in the Negro Baseball League for the Memphis Red Sox and the Kansas City Monarchs as a catcher from 1952 to 1957.

 

  • Written by Wiley Henry
  • Hits: 1466

Government Procurement Vendor Fair

AlandasDobbins 600In 2011, President Barack Obama launched StartUp America, a White House initiative targeted to increase entrepreneurship throughout the nation. Since its debut, Memphis government and business leaders have focused and dedicated resources and energy to augment entrepreneurship education and support.

To continue such efforts, the city of Memphis has partnered with the Memphis Office of Resources and Enterprise (MORE) to host the Government Procurement Vendor Fair on March 12th at The Lemoyne-Owen College. The event will run from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m.

Business owners will have the opportunities to network with local and federal government agencies as well as learn how to obtain resources available to improve their business internally and externally.

Kellogg’s makes its case

kelloggsLogo 600Representatives from the Kellogg Company have not made themselves available for questions from The New Tri-State Defender despite calls to get the company's viewpoint about the protracted labor dispute with members of the Bakery, Confectionery, Tobacco Workers and Grain Millers (BCTGM) International Union, Local 252G.

In a letter to employees dated Feb. 28th, Marty Carroll, senior vice president of KNA Supply Chain, and Chris Rook, Memphis plant manager, acknowledged the workers' frustration and disappointment and called it understandable.

"We are frustrated, too. It is deeply concerning to Kellogg that employees who have given so many years of quality service to this Company are not currently on the jobs in which you have served us so well. We want nothing more than a resolution to these negotiations so we can all get back to the important work of moving this plant forward, together. You have a choice in this matter, and we hope you choose to return to work."

 

Families suffer real hardship as Kellogg’s ‘lockout’ drags on

Kellogs 600"Four months! Four long months it's been since we were locked out of our jobs and forced onto this picket line every day, and we still have little hope that Kellogg's will ever come back to the table to bargain with good faith," said one locked out employee Wednesday afternoon.

"This so-called contract will be the end of us veteran employees, if we sign. There is no 'good faith' on their side."

His sign read: "Hey Kellogg's, Where Does Greed Fit Into Your 'K' Values?"

LEGACY: Thomas Maurice Sengstacke Picou

picou 600One family name is synonymous with the Black Press in the United States: Sengstacke. Thomas Maurice Sengstacke Picou, the nephew of John H. Sengstacke, played an integral part in helping his uncle build a family of newspapers that included The Chicago Defender, the Michigan Chronicle in Detroit, the New Pittsburgh Courier, and the Tri-State Defender in Memphis.

After Sengstacke's death in 1997, Picou acquired the funding to purchase Sengstacke Enterprises. He gained control in 2003 and created Real Times, Inc., a holding company that owned the newspapers. He served as Real Times' president, CEO and chairman and began rebuilding the brand to reflect the times.

On Feb. 8th, Picou died following a medical procedure at Centennial Hospital Medical Center in Inglewood, Calif. He was 76.

  • Written by Wiley Henry
  • Hits: 3212

Attorney Crump delivers amid ‘That’s alright’ energy at inaugural Conference on Family

crump 600Benjamin Crump leaned back onto the lectern, clutching the microphone – the moment punctuated by his lack of words and a silence that spoke to his deeply-rooted emotion.

A chorus of "That's alright" sprang from the crowd. Crump, who represented the family of Trayvon Martin in the 2013 case, State of Florida v George Zimmerman, lifted his microphone, head slightly bowed. This time he had the words.

"If we do not stand up for our children, nobody will," Crump said.

 

The MED evolves into Regional One Health

regionalone 600The Regional Medical Center at Memphis, known for 30 years as The MED, passed quietly into the annals of Memphis history Wednesday with the unveiling of a new name – Regional One Health.

CEO and President Reginald W. Coopwood took the wraps off the facility's new logo and name change, already posted where The MED used to be.

"When the Shelby County Health Care Corporation adopted the name Regional Medical Center in 1983, the organization was a stand-alone acute care hospital. Over the years, a broader reach of inpatient and outpatient services have been added, but we continued to be identified under the hospital name," explained Coopwood, who is also an MD.