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Greater Metro

The MED evolves into Regional One Health

regionalone 600The Regional Medical Center at Memphis, known for 30 years as The MED, passed quietly into the annals of Memphis history Wednesday with the unveiling of a new name – Regional One Health.

CEO and President Reginald W. Coopwood took the wraps off the facility's new logo and name change, already posted where The MED used to be.

"When the Shelby County Health Care Corporation adopted the name Regional Medical Center in 1983, the organization was a stand-alone acute care hospital. Over the years, a broader reach of inpatient and outpatient services have been added, but we continued to be identified under the hospital name," explained Coopwood, who is also an MD.

‘True Blue – Memphis Lawmen of 1948’

TrueBlue 600Local filmmaker George Tillman 's Creative Arts film company will screen its second completed documentary tonight (Feb. 26th) at Studio On The Square at 2105 Court St.

"True Blue – Memphis Lawmen of 1948" explores the impact of the historic 1948 hiring of the city's first African-American policemen, including their influence on the African-American directors that would later run the department.

Along with Tillman's earlier Cinematic Arts release, "True Blue – Memphis Lawmen of 1948" is being prepared for presentation at Langston University in Oklahoma and Chicago State University in March. Arrangements also are being finalized for presentations in Waukegan, Ill. and New York before submission on the independent film festival circuit.

BOOK REVIEW: Journey to preserve Owen College legacy is a mission accomplished

owencollege 600Preserving the legacy of an educational institution that thrived for 14 years in the South Memphis community and produced future leaders is worth the nearly two years that it took for a group of former students, faculty and staff to publish their efforts in a book entitled "The Legacy of Owen College: 1954-1968."

Produced by GrantHouse Publishers, The Owen College History Committee began its quest in April 2012 to save and secure the legacy of Owen College. Throughout its years of operation, the college enrolled nearly 4,000 men and women. Many of them would go on to succeed in life and add their accomplishments to the annals of Memphis and Shelby County as well.

The project was a labor of love for the approximately 20-member committee that set out to preserve the legacy of the accredited two-year liberal arts college for African Americans before a funding shortage forced a merger in 1968 with LeMoyne College to form The LeMoyne-Owen College.

  • Written by Wiley Henry
  • Hits: 972

A show of support…how much did it mean?

kellogrally 600Elected officials and friends of 226 locked-out Kellogg's employees raised an enthusiastic voice of determination Wednesday night, vowing to walk the picket lines outside the plant until they can return to work.

Kevin Bradshaw, president of Bakery Confectionary Tobacco Workers and Grain Millers International Union Local 252G, said he drew inspiration and encouragement from the outpouring of support shown by the "Memphis community."

"Although our numbers were small, tonight's rally means everything to those of us who are locked out of our jobs," Bradshaw said.

‘Let us work!’

kellogs 600'...This is not your grandfather's Kellogg's. The old administration was compassionate and caring toward its workers and their families. John Bryant cares nothing for those working on the line and making the company all of their profits. We have worked before without a contract in place. We knew that an agreement was coming. That's because both sides were negotiating in good faith. We were shocked to be locked out. We are not on strike. We did not walk off the line. We simply came to work on October 22nd last year, and we could not get in because the doors were closed and locked. We just want to go back to work. That's all. We hope this week with the rally that Kellogg's administrators will come back to the table and talk..."

Trence Jackson
BCTGM International Union
Financial Secretary

DSC 8471Four months ago when Kellogg's employees refused to approve a permanently lowered rate of pay for new employees, they knew that plant administrators wouldn't agree with the move. But they weren't expecting to be locked out of the plant where they've always "felt like family."

Not the ‘death sentence’ it used to be

Deberry 600Some of America's most fascinating luminaries succumbed to it – Dizzy Gillespie, the jazz icon; Sally Ride, the first American woman in space; Microsoft creator Steve Jobs; and Memphis' own political celeb, long-time House Speaker Pro-Tempore Lois DeBerry.

But pancreatic cancer – one of the more aggressive forms of cancer – is not the "death sentence" it used to be.

"There was a time when doctors would diagnose the disease and essentially send the patient home to die," said Alan Kosten, founder of the Herb Kosten Pancreatic Cancer Research Foundation, which raises funds to support research at the University of Tennessee Medical Center.

  • Written by Dr. Sybill C. Mitchell
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Rape kit backlog a ‘systematic failure,’ says Wharton

rapekit 600"Every day that a sexual assault kit goes untested is delayed justice, and justice delayed is justice denied," said Mayor A C Wharton Jr., referencing the over 12,000 untested rape kits in the City of Memphis.

Wednesday morning in the Hall of Mayors at City Hall, Wharton addressed what he referred to as a "systematic failure." He plans to develop a cross-functional team with representatives from law enforcement, and legal and victim advocate groups to address the rape kit-testing debacle.

To jumpstart those efforts, Wharton announced a partnership with the Joyful Heart Foundation, a national organization that has conducted groundbreaking research in identifying the nation's backlog of rape kits and best practices for eliminating rape kit testing delays.

 

Caution: ‘Dems’ changing lanes

demschanging 600The shellacking that local Democrats absorbed from Republicans in the August 2010 general election – a loss of every countywide seat – is still a fresh memory for attorney and former state legislator Carol Chumney.

Now, Chumney has watchful eyes on May's Shelby County primary and the August state and federal primaries and county elections. She contends that Democrats have come up short in recent elections in part because of the troubling practice of elected Democrats who have endorsed Republicans or cozied up to them for photo-ops.

Although the Republican 2010 sweep was marked in controversy over an election-day glitch followed by a Chancery Court lawsuit, it jumpstarted Chumney's quest to end the support of elected Democrats for Republicans.

 

  • Written by Wiley Henry
  • Hits: 864