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End of the ball: ‘Cinderella’ to close on Broadway January 2015

End of the ball: ‘Cinderella’ to close on Broadway January 2015
After a two-year run, Rodgers and Hammerstein’s Cinderella on Broadway will come to a close in January 2015.
 
The show’s last performance will be on January 3 and by that time will have had a total of 41 previews and 770 regular performances.
 
Over the two years, the show has earned nine Tony Award nominations in different categories yet has only taken home one for best costume.

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  • Written by theGrio

Mayweather’s Ex Opens Up About Abuse

Mayweather’s Ex Opens Up About Abuse
Floyd Mayweather may have a charming smile and debonair appearance, but behind those pearly whites is one big freakin’ a**hole.
 
Shantel Jackson says she was humiliated and allegedly abused by Floyd, her former fiancé, and now she’s filed suit against the champion boxer for assault, battery, defamation, invasion of privacy, intentional infliction of emotional distress, harassment and more.

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  • Written by Shamika Sanders-Hello Beautiful

Remember when black TV programs were angry and unapologetic?

Remember when black TV programs were angry and unapologetic?
When I was growing up in a northern-New Jersey ghetto in the early Afro-picked 1970s, my mom used to take me places in her car. Our radio dial was locked to 1430 WNJR, a soul AM station, and in the afternoons I would hear something at the top of the hour called “National Black Network News.” National black newscasters were talking about the condition of black people.
We don’t hear enough of that anymore.
 
I was reminded of that when I heard that William Greaves had passed away on Aug. 25 at the age of 87. Nearly 50 years ago, Greaves was fighting a war in the media world and we were all the beneficiaries. The skirmishes were over black public-affairs television programs – shows that presented undiluted African-American political, social and cultural views on white television during the height of the civil rights movement and black power eras. Greaves was a pioneer of one: “Black Journal.”

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  • Written by Todd Steven Burroughs-The Root

Twenty years later, UniverSoul Circus still rolling along

 Twenty years later, UniverSoul Circus still rolling along
This is about my tenth time going to the UniverSoul Circus and about the eighth time covering it. The circus performers may change but the theme remains the same: Having good family fun.
 
The venue was the Hickory Ridge Mall and the circus kicked off with SubRoy, a Memphis-area dance group that did a wonderful job. Perhaps my favorite circus act was next – The Caribbean Callaloo from Trinidad. Performers on stilts strut throughout the tent, towering over everyone. Then these beautiful women come out dancing in colorful outfits. Then comes the test of going under a stick blazing with fire. Wow! How low can you go?

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  • Written by Warren Roseborough

Brown Tribute ‘Don’t Shoot’

Brown Tribute ‘Don’t Shoot’
Michael Brown's death appears to be sparking an entire cultural movement, particularly among black musicians.
 
A group of powerful artists—including the Game, Diddy, Rick Ross, 2 Chains, Fabolous, Wale, DJ Khaled, Swizz Beats, Yo Gotti, Curren$y, Problem, King Pharaoh and TGT—have collaborated on the just-released single "Don't Shoot" in honor of the Ferguson, Mo., teen who was killed by a police officer.

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  • Written by BREANNA EDWARDS- The Root

The ‘real’ Muhammad Ali is depicted in a documentary about his life outside the ring

The ‘real’ Muhammad Ali is depicted in a documentary about his life outside the ring
CHICAGO (FinalCall.com) – One of the most recognizable figures on the Earth is Muhammad Ali. While many have heard his name and been told of his exploits in the ring, do you truly know his story?
 
You may know that he suffers from Parkinson’s disease and is not the fast-talking, swift moving athlete he once was. You may know that he joined the Nation of Islam, and you might even know that he refused to fight in America’s military, but how did he become such a beloved American figure?
You could say he has now become the quintessential American symbol. You don’t get much more American than carrying the Olympic torch and lighting the flame, as he did during the opening ceremonies of the 1996 games in Atlanta.

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  • Written by Ashahed M. Muhammad-Special to The New Tri-State Defender

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